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  1. #1 anyone tried pro circuit t-4 for qlink xf200? 
    C-Moto Noob
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    Dec 2008
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    Hi,

    I'm thinking about getting this pro circuit t-4 exhaust that I recently found out were available for xf200. But im also interested in anyone's experience with this one, has anyone here tried this exhaust? It replaces the front and back and would probably give alot of power, but not cheap.

    Here's the website where I first saw it: http://www.cbxmanmotorcycles.com/Pro...-Xf-Xp200.aspx

    btw,this is my first post I live in Norway and my bike is a qingqi gy-b 200cc 2007model, the importer is the same one as in Sweden and the bike is called TMS. I have the enduro type and I have used the bike at alot of mountin roads and normal roads. From 0 to 1800 KM this summer :) without any problems at all, though I think it needs a valve adjustment next spring.
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  2. #2  
    Honorary C-Moto Guru
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    I would go for the Xian racing one, available from the UK (less shipping charges).

    It also costs 65 rather than 152 for the Pro-circuit T4. I know that comes with the pipe as well, but in my view it's not neccessary to change that. The Xian racing can fits perfectly on the original pipe and by removing the oxidation catalyser insert inside the original exhaust, boosts performance considerably. It also sounds great...

    You can read all about it on this thread:

    http://www.mychinamoto.com/forums/showthread.php?t=499

    The seller's web site is at:

    http://xian.west-wire.co.uk/index.php

    Here's a photo of it fitted to my bike:

    Last edited by forchetto; 12-30-2008 at 09:35 AM.
    Jincheng Monkey JC50Q-7
    Skyteam Dax replica ST110-6
    Zongshen ZS125-43
    Qingqi QM200GY-BA Super Motard
    Qingqi QM110GY
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  3. #3  
    Administrator-tron CrazyCarl's Avatar
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    Bergspre,

    I see Forcehetto, the resident mechanical guru, has already covered your question but I just wanted to welcome you to MCM and encourage you to introduce yourself and post any photos of you and your ride in the "Welcome to MCM" section. Of course it's not mandatory but I'm sure a few of us would like to hear about where your from, what kind fo riding you do and how you got your QingQi.

    Paz,
    CC


    Quote Originally Posted by bergspre View Post
    btw,this is my first post I live in Norway and my bike is a qingqi gy-b 200cc 2007model, the importer is the same one as in Sweden and the bike is called TMS. I have the enduro type and I have used the bike at alot of mountin roads and normal roads. From 0 to 1800 KM this summer :) without any problems at all, though I think it needs a valve adjustment next spring.
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  4. #4  
    C-Moto Noob
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    That sounds good, I have a question.. Is the oxidation catalysator insert that you refer to the same thing as that clumpy thing sticking out of the front exhaust? Or is that something i can remove inside the front exhaust and still have the clumpy thing on there? I think that if you get stopped by the police its much easier to see that somethings been modified if you take out the "clump" (whats the name of this thing?) :)
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  5. #5  
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    The "lump" is part of the SAI (Secondary Air Injection) system and it's a one-way reed-type valve. It compliments the oxidation catalyser that's fitted inside the exhaust silencer. If you take off the silencer and look inside the inlet side you'll see this catalyser. It looks like this:



    On positive pressure pulses in the downpipe it admits filtered fresh air from the air cleaner and this extra air helps burn (or oxidise) hydrocarbons and CO in the exhaust, converting it to CO2.
    It works well enough, together with a weak mixture setting, to ensure that these relatively unsophisticated engines pass Euro 2 emissions homologation tests but tend to cause backfiring in the exhaust, high exhaust pipe temperatures that accelerate rusting (the hotter a metal gets, the better it combines with oxygen, or rusting) and are a safety hazard (they can often be seen glowing cherry-red hot!), loss of power and driveability due to the weak mixtures and backpressure in the exhaust. In addition the exhaust valves don't take kindly to being constantly exposed to waves of cold air. This extra heat is a good thing for the catalyser, though, as this works better the hotter it gets.

    The Japanese, Koreans, etc have used these systems, but in a much more sophisticated and well-made form, usually well integrated into the exhaust ports in the cylinder head, not just poking out of the exhaust pipes in a decidedly amateurish manner. They also employ vacuum sensitive valves and much more durable components. The Chinese on the other hand tend to use the cheapest systems, not very durable (the reed valve soon breaks and leaks causing the hose to collapse and burn), the components and poor-quality hoses are often haphazardly slung about the chassis, etc. This is because only one or two examples are initially tested by the Governments for homologation. Once these are approved the production versions are more carelessly installed. We are all aware of the Chinese manufacturers regard for rules and regulations...

    This is similar to the situation with Harley Davidsons, at least until they fitted fuel injection. Their Jurassic engines complied with the law, but only by stiffling the performance. Their performance was hardly in keeping with their status and cubic capacity. The enormous Harley upgrade catalogues and owners deep pockets soon corrected this situation by paying 1000's of additional dollars installing the right components to restore their performance...their owners seemed to think this was acceptable as well as the tooth-loosening vibration prior to the introduction of rubber-mounted engines.

    Modern engines no longer employ these systems. They have computer controlled fuel injection and a proper 3-way catalytic converter with Lambda probes, etc that not only comply with Euro 3 regulations but lose very little power and provide good driveability. We're still waiting for the Chinese to adopt this, and they'll have to, to be able to keep on selling vehicles in Europe.

    This is the typical reed air valve. To appreciate how it works and verify its correct operation you can remove it from the engine, place your mouth on the side that connects with the exhaust downpipe and alternatively blow and suck through it, you'll find that you can suck but not blow, it's really only a one-way valve:



    On the Qingqi it's not very visible and anyway no policeman would know what to look for or what the legal requirements are. Some models have them, others not. In any case you can leave it on or like some people do here in Spain, fit a blind alloy plate or a suitable ball bearing to block the hole between the device and its port to disable it. Visually it then remains the same to any nosey policeman.
    If you remove it, it's worth keeping the components to replace temporarily if the regular inspections require emissions testing.
    Last edited by forchetto; 01-01-2009 at 08:34 AM.
    Jincheng Monkey JC50Q-7
    Skyteam Dax replica ST110-6
    Zongshen ZS125-43
    Qingqi QM200GY-BA Super Motard
    Qingqi QM110GY
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